Making the most of every haemophilia appointment

Making the most of every haemophilia appointment

Before

  • Be prepared

    To help make every appointment meaningful to you, it's useful to have some things prepared ahead of time:

    • During the time between appointments, keep notes of any questions you have as you think of them.
    • As your appointment approaches, identify the key points you'd like to discuss (at least a few days beforehand).
    • Take a copy of your questions and key points with you, or add the list to your phone so you don't forget

    Doing this will help take the pressure off thinking on the spot and will give you enough time with your doctor to discuss your life and health priorities.

  • Educate yourself

    While you might have a good understanding of haemophilia and approaches to care, including information gathered from the internet or other resources, keep hold of any related notes and questions so that you can share and discuss them with your doctor.

During

  • Make your voice heard

    Your doctor is likely to have questions for you, but your appointment is also an opportunity to discuss your wants and needs. Just like with anyone else, your doctor will only know what's on your mind if you discuss it with them. 

    Aim to share your prepared questions during the appointment. Discuss your key points and ask any urgent questions first to make the most of the time with your doctor. 

After

  • Continue the conversation

    Your care doesn't end after your appointment. If you still have questions, get in contact with your doctor or healthcare team.

    Also follow up with any results you are waiting for from your centre – you can always get in touch with them to ask. You can also start thinking about what you'd like to get out of your next appointment and prepare in advance.

Download ‘My Voice, My Care’ to understand how to get the most out of conversations with your care team.

Making the most of every haemophilia appointment

Before

  • Be prepared

    To help make every appointment meaningful to you, it's useful to have some things prepared ahead of time:

    • During the time between appointments, keep notes of any questions you have as you think of them.
    • As your appointment approaches, identify the key points you'd like to discuss (at least a few days beforehand).
    • Take a copy of your questions and key points with you, or add the list to your phone so you don't forget

    Doing this will help take the pressure off thinking on the spot and will give you enough time with your doctor to discuss your life and health priorities.

  • Educate yourself

    While you might have a good understanding of haemophilia and approaches to care, including information gathered from the internet or other resources, keep hold of any related notes and questions so that you can share and discuss them with your doctor.

During

  • Make your voice heard

    Your doctor is likely to have questions for you, but your appointment is also an opportunity to discuss your wants and needs. Just like with anyone else, your doctor will only know what's on your mind if you discuss it with them. 

    Aim to share your prepared questions during the appointment. Discuss your key points and ask any urgent questions first to make the most of the time with your doctor. 

After

  • Continue the conversation

    Your care doesn't end after your appointment. If you still have questions, get in contact with your doctor or healthcare team.

    Also follow up with any results you are waiting for from your centre – you can always get in touch with them to ask. You can also start thinking about what you'd like to get out of your next appointment and prepare in advance.

Download ‘My Voice, My Care’ to understand how to get the most out of conversations with your care team.