Traveling with haemophilia

Spread those wings!

“To travel is to live,” wrote Hans Christian Andersen. While many of us love the idea of travel, it can present challenges for anyone – and sometimes a few more for people living with haemophilia.

If you’ve travelled with haemophilia before, you’ve probably already experienced different sorts of limitations, both financial and medical. For starters, although completely unavoidable, travel insurance can unfortunately be expensive for people with chronic illnesses. And then there’s the worry that you might not have access to good treatment – or healthcare providers who speak your language – when travelling abroad.

With that said, travel is one of life’s greatest pleasures. When you are living with haemophilia, it just takes a bit of extra planning! So let’s talk about that.

As easy as 1-2-3

Just like much in life, preparation is key when travelling. Here are three basic steps to make sure your new adventure is smooth sailing so you can move on with the more important things … like checking the 10-day weather forecast.

Talk
 

Talk to your care team before you book anything. They can advise you and help with preparations – including documents and medication – depending on your individual situation.

It’s also a good idea to get your doctor to write a letter with information about your condition and the usual treatment you receive. Just to cover all bases, it can be worthwhile getting the letter translated into the language of the place you are visiting.

Plan

 

When booking accommodation, find a place with a refrigerator in which you can store your treatment. This is extra important if you’re off to a warmer destination! 

Double check (then triple check) that your travel insurance is in order. No one should ever go on holiday without it —and this is especially true for someone living with haemophilia.

Before you go, let the nearest Haemophilia Treatment Centre at your destination know you’re coming. You can find that information at this link.

Pack

 

As products can vary a lot from country to country, bring your own treatment with you. If you’re flying, make sure you’re carrying it onboard the plane as hand luggage; this way it’s safely within sight and reach.

For the airport security staff, carry a letter explaining why you are carrying liquids, medicines, needles, syringes etc. Preferably in the language of your destination, make sure that the letter states the possible implications of not having them immediately at hand. Have a photocopy of all necessary travel documents including insurance policies and doctors’ letters. It’s a good idea to take a photo of these too, so you have them on your phone at all times.

Traveling with haemophilia

 

 

 

NP-7859

Spread those wings!

“To travel is to live,” wrote Hans Christian Andersen. While many of us love the idea of travel, it can present challenges for anyone – and sometimes a few more for people living with haemophilia.

If you’ve travelled with haemophilia before, you’ve probably already experienced different sorts of limitations, both financial and medical. For starters, although completely unavoidable, travel insurance can unfortunately be expensive for people with chronic illnesses. And then there’s the worry that you might not have access to good treatment – or healthcare providers who speak your language – when travelling abroad.

With that said, travel is one of life’s greatest pleasures. When you are living with haemophilia, it just takes a bit of extra planning! So let’s talk about that.

As easy as 1-2-3

Just like much in life, preparation is key when travelling. Here are three basic steps to make sure your new adventure is smooth sailing so you can move on with the more important things … like checking the 10-day weather forecast.

Talk
 

Talk to your care team before you book anything. They can advise you and help with preparations – including documents and medication – depending on your individual situation.

It’s also a good idea to get your doctor to write a letter with information about your condition and the usual treatment you receive. Just to cover all bases, it can be worthwhile getting the letter translated into the language of the place you are visiting.

Plan

 

When booking accommodation, find a place with a refrigerator in which you can store your treatment. This is extra important if you’re off to a warmer destination! 

Double check (then triple check) that your travel insurance is in order. No one should ever go on holiday without it —and this is especially true for someone living with haemophilia.

Before you go, let the nearest Haemophilia Treatment Centre at your destination know you’re coming. You can find that information at this link.

Pack

 

As products can vary a lot from country to country, bring your own treatment with you. If you’re flying, make sure you’re carrying it onboard the plane as hand luggage; this way it’s safely within sight and reach.

For the airport security staff, carry a letter explaining why you are carrying liquids, medicines, needles, syringes etc. Preferably in the language of your destination, make sure that the letter states the possible implications of not having them immediately at hand. Have a photocopy of all necessary travel documents including insurance policies and doctors’ letters. It’s a good idea to take a photo of these too, so you have them on your phone at all times.

Traveling with haemophilia

 

 

 

NP-7859