I'm a young adult living with haemophilia

I'm a young adult living with haemophilia

The years of transition from the end of your teens and the start of early adulthood are some of the most exciting and important in your life. You might be getting ready to finish school, move out of home and begin life as a strong, independent person away from your family and where you grew up. But as you continue to grow, so do your responsibilities. As exciting as this stage of life is for someone living with haemophilia, it can also be nerve-wracking: on top of all the other new beginnings you also have to think about managing your haemophilia by yourself. But it doesn’t have to feel like this! With the right support and information, your journey through young adulthood can be just as fantastic, adventurous and empowering as you want it to be.

Control living with haemophilia!

As you get older, one thing that changes when it comes to your haemophilia is that you are faced with more responsibilities. This can be just as empowering as it is scary. As well as having to manoeuvre through the daily chores of a ‘grown-up,’ you will also have to start managing your treatment and health on your own. This includes doing things like maintaining an ongoing dialogue with your healthcare team, attending appointments, ordering medication and keeping a treatment log. At first this may seem overwhelming but with time, as it becomes a part of your new lifestyle, you will master the routine as naturally as you’ll be doing the dishes! 

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Breaking free from Haemophilia

Finding your own way


Having haemophilia as a teenager or young adult can be challenging. During this period of life, all the demands on you – sticking to treatment plans, handling injections, social stresses, planning and family pressure – can feel too much at times. But it doesn’t all have to be negative. Life now is about breaking free, learning to find your own balance between protection and possibility.
 

Opening up 


It’s understandable if you don’t particularly want to stand up and announce your haemophilia to a group of friends or your whole class. But it’s also important to remember that in contrast to your first years in school, things are different when you’re more grown up. Your peers at university or your workplace are probably more mature and understanding than those in your younger years and they’re much more likely to be open-minded and supportive of your condition. Give it a go!

Talk about sex with haemophilia

First things first: sex is entirely normal and healthy for someone living with haemophilia, just like everyone. With that said, there are naturally some questions you will have about sex in relation to your condition. It might not be something you will be rushing to discuss with your parents – but it is important that you discuss it with somebody you feel comfortable with, who can answer any questions you might have, like your doctor or another member of your care team. 

If you’ve met someone special and you’re not sure when or how to tell them about your haemophilia, there’s one very important thing to keep in mind: it’s up to you! You can ask yourself some basic questions like: Would I want to know if it were the other way around? Can the conversation come up naturally? Will I be able to explain my condition and answer any questions they may have?

It might not be easy, but most of the time the best approach is simply busting myths and educating people about haemophilia, discussing your particular condition or treatment plan. If they’re worth your time, they will be understanding and supportive. 

The best advice when it comes to sex and haemophilia is to find someone in your haemophilia network, either online or in-person, who’s a few years older than you, and ask them how they handled the situation when they were your age. Chances are they’ll be more than happy to share their wisdom! 

Click here to continue reading about the many possibilities for a life beyond haemophilia.

 

 

 

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I'm a young adult living with haemophilia

The years of transition from the end of your teens and the start of early adulthood are some of the most exciting and important in your life. You might be getting ready to finish school, move out of home and begin life as a strong, independent person away from your family and where you grew up. But as you continue to grow, so do your responsibilities. As exciting as this stage of life is for someone living with haemophilia, it can also be nerve-wracking: on top of all the other new beginnings you also have to think about managing your haemophilia by yourself. But it doesn’t have to feel like this! With the right support and information, your journey through young adulthood can be just as fantastic, adventurous and empowering as you want it to be.

Control living with haemophilia!

As you get older, one thing that changes when it comes to your haemophilia is that you are faced with more responsibilities. This can be just as empowering as it is scary. As well as having to manoeuvre through the daily chores of a ‘grown-up,’ you will also have to start managing your treatment and health on your own. This includes doing things like maintaining an ongoing dialogue with your healthcare team, attending appointments, ordering medication and keeping a treatment log. At first this may seem overwhelming but with time, as it becomes a part of your new lifestyle, you will master the routine as naturally as you’ll be doing the dishes! 

Responsive banner
Breaking free from Haemophilia

Finding your own way


Having haemophilia as a teenager or young adult can be challenging. During this period of life, all the demands on you – sticking to treatment plans, handling injections, social stresses, planning and family pressure – can feel too much at times. But it doesn’t all have to be negative. Life now is about breaking free, learning to find your own balance between protection and possibility.
 

Opening up 


It’s understandable if you don’t particularly want to stand up and announce your haemophilia to a group of friends or your whole class. But it’s also important to remember that in contrast to your first years in school, things are different when you’re more grown up. Your peers at university or your workplace are probably more mature and understanding than those in your younger years and they’re much more likely to be open-minded and supportive of your condition. Give it a go!

Talk about sex with haemophilia

First things first: sex is entirely normal and healthy for someone living with haemophilia, just like everyone. With that said, there are naturally some questions you will have about sex in relation to your condition. It might not be something you will be rushing to discuss with your parents – but it is important that you discuss it with somebody you feel comfortable with, who can answer any questions you might have, like your doctor or another member of your care team. 

If you’ve met someone special and you’re not sure when or how to tell them about your haemophilia, there’s one very important thing to keep in mind: it’s up to you! You can ask yourself some basic questions like: Would I want to know if it were the other way around? Can the conversation come up naturally? Will I be able to explain my condition and answer any questions they may have?

It might not be easy, but most of the time the best approach is simply busting myths and educating people about haemophilia, discussing your particular condition or treatment plan. If they’re worth your time, they will be understanding and supportive. 

The best advice when it comes to sex and haemophilia is to find someone in your haemophilia network, either online or in-person, who’s a few years older than you, and ask them how they handled the situation when they were your age. Chances are they’ll be more than happy to share their wisdom! 

Click here to continue reading about the many possibilities for a life beyond haemophilia.

 

 

 

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