Working with haemophilia

If you can dream it, do it

“What do you want to be when you grow up?” was something we all were asked when young. And although it’s not entirely realistic for someone living with haemophilia to become an astronaut or a firefighter, there are plenty of other options today that years ago were not possible.

Modern medicine is to thank for the developments in haemophilia care and the wide selection of career choices that are possible today. Back in the day, living with haemophilia meant regular, unpredictable bleeds and periods of hospitalisation which in turn negatively influenced possible career paths. Understandably, this caused many people to conceal their condition. These days, things are very different — the world is yours for the taking!

To tell or not to tell?

About to start a new job? You’re probably wondering whether you should tell your workplace about your haemophilia. Well, the good news is: it’s entirely up to you.

If your haemophilia is mild and you know it won’t affect your work, you might choose to keep it to yourself in the beginning. Once you’ve settled in, you may feel more comfortable about letting your colleagues know, educating them about the condition and what it means for you.

If you believe that having haemophilia may interfere with your new job, it might be worthwhile to reconsider if this is really the right job for you? It may be a good idea to talk it over with your care team who can advise you and support you in your decision.

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What are my rights?

First things first: it is against the law for employers to discriminate against you because of your haemophilia.

Recruiting staff sometimes ask questions about health or disabilities, but only to determine whether it is possible for you to carry out a task essential for the position. So if you’re applying for a job in a call centre, you shouldn’t have to answer any questions about your condition. In some countries, employers are not allowed to ask you if you have a disability and you are not obliged to tell them anything about your haemophilia (unless it directly affects your job).

As rights and regulations vary from country to country, make sure you know the regulations in your specific location.

What are my possibilities?

Preventative treatment options such as prophylaxis are today opening up careers for people with haemophilia in construction and working with heavy machinery – areas that once were never seen as possible. Developments in haemophilia care have paved the way for many new careers and workplace environments once regarded as ‘off-limits’.

As great as these developments are, remember that having a medical condition like haemophilia may still come with risks. Some career paths, like working for the police or fire brigade, are still not accessible but if the potential risks are well managed, the majority of occupations should be open to you and are limited only by your imagination. 
With an open mind and a bit of advice from your support network, it is more than possible for you to land your dream job.

working

 

 

 

NP-7859

If you can dream it, do it

“What do you want to be when you grow up?” was something we all were asked when young. And although it’s not entirely realistic for someone living with haemophilia to become an astronaut or a firefighter, there are plenty of other options today that years ago were not possible.

Modern medicine is to thank for the developments in haemophilia care and the wide selection of career choices that are possible today. Back in the day, living with haemophilia meant regular, unpredictable bleeds and periods of hospitalisation which in turn negatively influenced possible career paths. Understandably, this caused many people to conceal their condition. These days, things are very different — the world is yours for the taking!

To tell or not to tell?

About to start a new job? You’re probably wondering whether you should tell your workplace about your haemophilia. Well, the good news is: it’s entirely up to you.

If your haemophilia is mild and you know it won’t affect your work, you might choose to keep it to yourself in the beginning. Once you’ve settled in, you may feel more comfortable about letting your colleagues know, educating them about the condition and what it means for you.

If you believe that having haemophilia may interfere with your new job, it might be worthwhile to reconsider if this is really the right job for you? It may be a good idea to talk it over with your care team who can advise you and support you in your decision.

Responsive banner

What are my rights?

First things first: it is against the law for employers to discriminate against you because of your haemophilia.

Recruiting staff sometimes ask questions about health or disabilities, but only to determine whether it is possible for you to carry out a task essential for the position. So if you’re applying for a job in a call centre, you shouldn’t have to answer any questions about your condition. In some countries, employers are not allowed to ask you if you have a disability and you are not obliged to tell them anything about your haemophilia (unless it directly affects your job).

As rights and regulations vary from country to country, make sure you know the regulations in your specific location.

What are my possibilities?

Preventative treatment options such as prophylaxis are today opening up careers for people with haemophilia in construction and working with heavy machinery – areas that once were never seen as possible. Developments in haemophilia care have paved the way for many new careers and workplace environments once regarded as ‘off-limits’.

As great as these developments are, remember that having a medical condition like haemophilia may still come with risks. Some career paths, like working for the police or fire brigade, are still not accessible but if the potential risks are well managed, the majority of occupations should be open to you and are limited only by your imagination. 
With an open mind and a bit of advice from your support network, it is more than possible for you to land your dream job.

working

 

 

 

NP-7859